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Tutorials

Nautilus Actions : Tutorials

Here is a list of tutorials that will present how to use and configure nautilus-actions :

Note: You can also find some useful tutorials or other examples in the External Resources page

Tutorials : 3. Development of a little gtk application in python to add a copyright notice on your photos

Note: Updated for version 1.0.

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Summary

This tutorial will show you how to configure nautilus-actions to be able to add a copyright notice or any kind of text on the selected photos.

In this tutorial, we will see how to developped a simple GTK application with glade and python that will be launched by nautilus-actions. This application will be used to retrieve some informations we need to accomplish the action (eg, the text to write, the position of the text and a prefix to add to the new photos' filename).

Tutorials : 2. How to test the parameters sent by nautilus to your nautilus-actions config

Note: Updated for 0.7 version.

Summary

This tutorial will show you how to configure nautilus-actions to be able to verify the parameters sent by nautilus.

This tutorial could be useful if you have weird behaviour, or you want to be sure that the parameters send to your script or application are good (to avoid sending /home/foobar to the rm -rf command instead of /home/foobar/test because you put %p (parent dir) instead of %d (current dir) in the parameter field, for example).

Tutorials : 1. How to configure nautilus-actions to be able to launch a command throught SSH

Note: Updated for 1.2 version.

Summary

This tutorial will show you how to configure nautilus-actions to be able to edit a file with gvim throught ssh.

Not all applications support Gnome-vfs yet and some people prefers editing files with more advanced application than gedit, like gvim or xemacs for example. So it can be useful to be able to use them directly from nautilus instead of having to open a terminal, log in with ssh, change to the working folder and finally run gvim or xemacs on your file.

As I am a vi user, I will explain this tutorial using gvim as an example, but you can of course replace gvim by your preferred editor anywhere it will appears.